Mokshith Voodarla, a high school student with a cause @OLPC

Mokshith Voodarla is a high school student who made a generous donation to OLPC.

Read his thoughts about the impact of technology in his own life and in the world:

 

From a young age, I’ve been amazed by the way technology helps us in our daily lives. It was mind-boggling to me when I saw subtle things like turning on a TV with a remote happen. This led me to the realization that I wanted to build technology that made people’s lives easier. I’ve always liked to see something happen after writing a program. This started off with LEGO Mindstorms but has come all the way to building Android Apps that automatically take notes for you when taking a picture of a textbook. 

I wanted to benefit as many people as I could with the knowledge I had so I decided to teach kids how to build Android apps. While doing this, I wanted to maximize the benefit of this work, and that’s when I remembered One Laptop Per Child. I’ve always taken for granted the resources I had to do things and I wanted as many people as possible to receive the resources and opportunities to do the same. I realized that by donating to OLPC, my work would help benefit a lot of people. I chose to do just that. 


Working with the kids was great. We started off from them not knowing anything at all to them being able to build a whole calculator all by themselves. We did this over the course of nine weeks. I was happy that I was able to spread that feeling of amazement on many people’s faces when they saw that what they programmed. That kind of feeling is what I live for and I really felt it when I saw those kids experience just that. The feeling itself is indescribable but it’s just amazing. 

Teaching these students and then being able to donate to OLPC was a very worthwhile experience for me and I would recommend if anyone else can, they should make a donation as well. OLPC does great things in developing countries and is a real reason why the world is accelerating faster and faster all the time. All reasons support helping the OLPC cause.

How Ometepe Became Latin America’s First Digital Island

Originaly posted BY ON

By Leah Shadle on behalf of One Laptop Per Child

In the heart of Nicaragua lies the largest lake in Central America, Lake Nicaragua. Millions of years ago, a volcanic eruption formed a curious island in this freshwater lake composed of two volcanoes — Concepcion and Maderas — the former of which is still active. Concepcion has an altitude of 1,610 meters, which makes Ometepe the world’s highest island on a lake. Volcanic ash has created an extremely fertile island and the volcanoes are visible everywhere on the island. Ometepe is truly a paradise, with its tropical, lush and magical air and soil.

In addition to the natural brilliance of the island and its volcanoes, Ometepe recently became the first digital island in the Americas. To put that in numbers, 100% of its 5,000 elementary school children and all teachers received a laptop connected to high-speed Internet, as part of the One Laptop Per Child educational initiative. Participating students and teachers receive OLPC laptops and the training and support needed to truly realize the potential of these machines

Continue reading HERE.

Learning from Seymour Papert – #BacktoLearning

Far beyond the idea of giving computers to children with “an educational purpose”, like if education meant just providing content to be consumed, the origins of the learning philosophy of OLPC has been to provide kids with computers so that they can compute.

 

Seymour Papert believed, supported by decades of research, that by computing (coding, programming), the learner could be empowered to understand, create and think about their own learning, especially at early childhoold.

This panel from the Spring 2014 Member Event at the MIT Media Lab will explore more in detail the learning vision of Papert. Enjoy!

Panelists: Mitch Resnick, Marvin Minsky, Alan Kay, and Nicholas Negroponte.

Why schools should provide one laptop per child

, Professor of Education and Informatics from the University of California, Irvine and ,  Assistant Professor from the Michigan State University, recently posted an article asking if there is a need to abandon attempts to integrate technology in schools due to a recent international study published by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, which found no positive evidence of impact of educational technology on student performance.

According to the article, Professor Warschauer and Assistant Professor Zheng, have conducted their…

…own extensive observations. We conducted a synthesis of the results of 96 published global studies on these programs in K-12 schools during 2001-2015. Among them, 10 rigorously designed studies, mostly from the U.S., were included, to examine the relationship between these programs and academic achievement. We found significant benefits.We found students’ test scores in science, writing, math and English language arts improved significantly.

And the benefits were not limited to test scores.

To find out about their conclusions and read the full article, please click here.

 

Disclosure statement

Mark Warschauer has received funding for his research from the National Science Foundation, the Institute of Education Sciences, the Carnegie Corporation, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, the Spencer Foundation, the John Randolph Haynes and Dora Haynes Foundation, and Google Research.

Binbin Zheng does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond the academic appointment above

. @MoneyGramMe Foundation Reinvests in Innovative Educational Organizations in 2016

Grants of nearly $300,000 will support educational programs

Original post from  MoneyGram

DALLAS, June 14, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — MoneyGram (NASDAQ: MGI) today announced the MoneyGram Foundation will award seven grants across seven countries for the first grant cycle of 2016. The foundation will renew its support to innovative educational programs operating in India, Jamaica, Laos, Nicaragua, Pakistan and Vietnam, as well as in four cities in the United States.

“The MoneyGram Foundation is honored to continue to support programs around the world that are making a meaningful and measurable difference for children’s education in communities where our customers live and work,” said Pamela H. Patsley, MoneyGram’s  executive chairman. “MoneyGram is proud to expand our foundation’s work to Laos and Nicaragua through these established programs.”

The recipients in the foundation’s first grant round of 2016 include:

  • Agastya International Foundation, to continue funding three mobile science labs traveling to Darbhanga, Mumbai, and Aligarh with the mission of providing an experiential, hands-on science education program to thousands of economically disadvantaged children.
  • Children of Vietnam, to fund the construction of a 25 x 30 foot weather-resistant school building in A Pat village in Tay Giang District, Quang Nam Province, complete with ceiling fan, lighting, electrical system, water system, indoor plumbing and awning for shade. When complete, it will be the sole school building for the community.
  • Developments in Literacy, to fully fund the operational and administrative costs of the Nai Abadi school located in Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  • First Book, to fund a book donation through the Día de Los Libros initiative in the United States (Dallas, Los Angeles, New York and Miami) and Jamaica.
  • Grants for Innovative Teaching (GFIT), a Signature Project of the Junior League of Dallas that encourages and supports excellence in teaching by awarding grants up to $2,000 to Dallas ISD teachers for innovative projects that otherwise would not be provided for in schools budgets.
  • One Laptop Per Child (OLPC), to fully fund the implementation of the “MathemaTIC” educational program in two schools in Chinandega, Nicaragua. The schools will receive 300 laptops to complete the program.
  • Pencils of Promise (PoP), to fund one of 14 schools Pencils of Promise will build in the Luang Prabang Region of Laos this year. A typical PoP school has 4 classrooms and a minimum lifespan of 20 years.

The MoneyGram Foundation plans to distribute two more rounds of grants in 2016. To learn more about the MoneyGram Foundation and the projects it supports, please visit moneygramfoundation.org.

#moneygramfoundation

 

Switched-on youth – CASE STUDY: @OLPC

Technology plays a momentous role in shaping the future of our societies and ensuring that the next generation is prepared to cope with the burdens – and embrace the opportunities – to come. So, how exactly are we enabling our youth to contribute in this digital era?

Read this article by Stephanie Spurr posted at International Innovation where

Mariana Ludmila Cortés, VP of Business Development at OLPC, explains how the non-profit organisation is enabling children in developing countries to access educational devices for self-empowered learning.

You can read the article here and/or download the PDF here.

 

3 Becas 75% para maestría en Innovación Educativa – Universidad ORT

ortbeca

La Universidad ORT México es una institución de educación superior dedicada a impulsar y fortalecer al sector social a través de la formación de profesionales comprometidos y competentes en áreas de Responsabilidad, Emprendimiento y Liderazgo Social.

Derivado del Convenio OLPC – ORT, ofrecemos 3 becas del 75% para la Maestría en Innovación Educativa, para las primeras tres personas que concluyan el proceso de admisión.
OFERTA ACADÉMICA
Licenciatura en Administración y Responsabilidad Social* (EN LÍNEA)
Especialidad en Ética y Sociedad RVOE SEP 20150321
Maestría en Administración y Emprendimiento Social RVOE SEP 20150324
Maestría en Innovación Educativa RVOE SEP 20150323
Maestría en Educación Ambiental RVOE SEP 20150322
Maestría en Orientación Educativa para la Prevención de Adicciones*

SOLICITA INFORMACIÓN:

www.ort.edu.mx

*La Licenciatura en Administración y Responsabilidad Social y la Maestría en Orientación Educativa para la Prevención de Adicciones, se encuentran en trámite para obtener el Reconocimiento de Validez Oficial ante la SEP.

What to pay attention to when teaching

A Drop in Performance Can be a Sign of More Advanced Thinking

Sidney Strauss
School of Psychology
Center for Academic Studies
Or Yehuda

Branco Weiss Professor of Research in Child Development and Education (Emeritus)

School of Education
Tel Aviv University

We all know that children get better at solving problems as they get older. Learning is always upwards and onwards. Children get better in their understanding over time. For example, children age 6 can solve all the problems they were able to solve at age four, and then some. This commonplace understanding of learning on the part of educators, parents, etc. is confirmed in our everyday observations.

But there is a surprise here. A line of research I began in the 1980’s, and which continues to this very day, shows that what we take for granted is not always the case. Studies of cognitive development indicate that, for some tasks, children have what is called U-shaped behavioral growth. What this means is that younger children solve a task correctly, older children solve the same task incorrectly and still older children solve it correctly.

Here’s an example. Let’s say we have three cups, two of which have the same amount of water at the same temperature and one of which is empty. We tell the children that the water in the two cups is cold and that they are equally cold. We then pour the water from those two cups into the third, empty cup and proceed to ask the children what the temperature in now. Children age around 4 say, correctly, that it’s the same temperature because all we did was mix same temperature water. Older children around age 6, say that the mixed water is twice as cold as the original water because there is now twice the amount of water. And children around age 8 return to the correct answer that it is the same temperature as the original water because even though there is the more water, that doesn’t mean the water is colder. It’s just more cold water at the same temperature.

Lest the reader think this is an isolated phenomenon that is found only for temperature this surprising finding has been found for tasks that tap children’s understandings of other physics concepts, such as viscosity, sweetness of water, density and pressure. And U-shaped behavioral growth has been found in other domains, as well, such as language learning, the use of metaphors and more.

So how does this happen? How is it that our commonplace understanding of always getting better has sometimes been shown not to be the case? How is it that children are getting worse in problem solving over time?

One answer to these questions is that children actually do improve their underlying thinking over time, but sometimes an advance in what gives rise to answers leads to a drop in their performance in problem-solving. For example, to return to our case of temperature, the youngest children do not pay attention to the amount of water; the older children do pay attention to the amount of water but erroneously think that more of one thing (amount of water) increases another thing (temperature); and the oldest children also pay attention to the amount of water but they don’t think that it affects the temperature.

Notice that not paying attention to the amount of water (that leads to a correct answer) is less advanced than attending to the amount of water (that leads to an incorrect answer). What that means is that in tasks such as this, as our thinking advances, there is a drop in performance.

Normally, were we to see a child solving a task correctly and then after a while she solves it incorrectly, we might get worried. But the way I showed how this drop works, we would understand that that drop in performance is a sign of cognitive advance.

What this implies is that, when teaching, we should pay attention to children’s reasoning about a problem more than if their answer to that problem is correct or not.

Reference:

Strauss, S. (with R. Stavy). (Eds.). (1982). U-shaped behavioral growth. New York: Academic Press.

Sydney Straus is a member of the OLPC Learning Board.

Film festival hosted by a 15-year-old to raise awareness for OLPC

At OLPC we love when we receive messages like this one. It definitely encourages us to keep on moving forward.  Thank you Sydney S!

image001

I’m incredibly happy to be supporting such an organization as One Laptop Per Child. Thank you for being so receptive to a student like myself and for making this process as easy and fun as possible.

I have attached two photos from the event if you need them and here is some information about the film festival:

“Short Films, Long Lasting Effects” is a student film festival dedicated to promoting the art of filmmaking, while raising money and awareness for the charity One Laptop Per Child. This year’s inaugural event, created by 15-year-old sophomore Sydney S, was held on April 15, 2016 at Westhampton Beach High School on Long Island, New York and featured nine student films. Sydney developed a passion for filmmaking in the fourth grade, which led her to premiere her first movie at the local theater, to attend New York Film Academy programs twice, and to lecture about technology both online for a global audience at the Student Technology Conference and at the Suffolk ASSET Conference, the largest technology conference for teachers and administrators on Long Island. This film and technology background encouraged Sydney to fulfill her goal of hosting a charitable film festival.image002
“Short Films, Long Lasting Effects” brought together people from all areas of the community to highlight the talents of Long Island filmmakers. The short films were judged by industry professionals from the community, and a fan favorite prize was awarded to the movie that could raise the most money for One Laptop Per Child in its designated jar. About 100 people filled the seats of the auditorium during the film festival and volunteers in their bright blue shirts were lined up behind donation tables prepared to answer any incoming questions. “Short Films, Long Lasting Effects” was greatly enjoyed by all who attended and with the combined efforts of the film festival and fundraising in the community, succeeded in its goal of raising money to help One Laptop Per Child send laptops to the children in need around the world.

Best,
Sydney S.

Ibirapitá, proyecto de inclusión digital de jubilados en Uruguay. @Plan_Ceibal

El cerebro no se jubila.

Antonio M. Battro

Academia Nacional de Educación, www.acaedu.edu.ar

Pontificia Academia de Ciencias, www.pas.va

Esta nota se propone exponer el mensaje contundente de la gran bióloga italiana a la luz de Ibirapitá, el nuevo programa de inclusión digital del gobierno del Uruguay que ha comenzado a distribuir tabletas conectadas a Internet a las personas jubiladas con ingresos reducidos. Es decir, los mayores de 65 años contarán con los mismos recursos digitales que ya sus nietos han recibido a partir de los 5 años, gracias al “modelo uno a uno”, una laptop/tablet por niño del Plan Ceibal (www.ceibal.edu.uy). De esta manera se está construyendo en el Uruguay un amplio y generoso puente digital que abraza 60 años de vida. Este programa de inclusión digital inter-generacional, el primero de su tipo en el mundo, merece destacarse y ser imitado.

Pueden leer el documento aquí.

Sustainable education: Uruguay’s @Plan_Ceibal

ANTONIO M. BATTRO AND CECILIA DE LA PAZ

Sustainable Humanity, Sustainable Nature: Our Responsibility Pontifical Academy of Sciences, Extra Series 41, Vatican City 2014 Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences, Acta 20, Vatican City 2014 www.pas.va/content/dam/accademia/pdf/es41/es41-battro.pd

This meeting on “sustainable humanity and sustainable nature” is a valuable opportunity to introduce and discuss the notion of “sustainable education”.We are willing to understand and improve the interactions between “human capital and natural capital”.Education is part of the human capital of our societies but the notion of “sustainable education” is still under construction and needs special consideration. In particular it is impossible to imagine a sustainable school system that remains independent of the rapidly expanding digital environment of today.Our society has created a new“virtual ecosystem” which is covering the planet and is modifying the life of millions.The good news is that education can play,and is playing in many cases,an increasing and constructive role in this global process towards equity and solidarity in the human family.We are convinced that a sustainable education must be based on evidences and not on ideologies.A sustainable education must be supported by political, economical, social, technological and pedagogical sustainable programs.

Continue reading here or below:

Animated Video and Call to Action – @OLPCCanada

The OLPC Canada team is excited to share a new animated video highlighting some of the inspiring outcomes when Aboriginal students are connected with educational technology. Please help us build awareness of this initiative by sharing this video on Facebook and Twitter and liking it on Youtube.

OLPC Canada provides 21st century educational tools to Aboriginal students nationwide. To date, they have connected more than 60 Aboriginal education programs and 9,000 students to technology designed with children in mind. Please help raise awareness about this initiative by sharing this video. It takes a network to connect a child.

Learn more at: www.olpccanada.com

OLPC Congratulates Founder of Paraguay Educa

Congratulations to Cecilia Rodriguez Alcala, who was selected as the MBA Student of the Year Award by the Association of MBAs at Tufts University in the United States!

Cecilia is the founder of Paraguay Educa, an NGO which created the first digital city in Paraguay through the implementation of the One Laptop per Child program in the city of Caacupé.  Her important work has resulted in the provision of laptops, training and connectivity to 10,000 children in Paraguay. On behalf of OLPC, we send our gratitude and congratulations!

To read more about Cecilia and this award click here.

Here a video where Cecilia provides more details about here experience with Paraguay Educa: