3 Becas 75% para maestría en Innovación Educativa – Universidad ORT

ortbeca

La Universidad ORT México es una institución de educación superior dedicada a impulsar y fortalecer al sector social a través de la formación de profesionales comprometidos y competentes en áreas de Responsabilidad, Emprendimiento y Liderazgo Social.

Derivado del Convenio OLPC – ORT, ofrecemos 3 becas del 75% para la Maestría en Innovación Educativa, para las primeras tres personas que concluyan el proceso de admisión.
OFERTA ACADÉMICA
Licenciatura en Administración y Responsabilidad Social* (EN LÍNEA)
Especialidad en Ética y Sociedad RVOE SEP 20150321
Maestría en Administración y Emprendimiento Social RVOE SEP 20150324
Maestría en Innovación Educativa RVOE SEP 20150323
Maestría en Educación Ambiental RVOE SEP 20150322
Maestría en Orientación Educativa para la Prevención de Adicciones*

SOLICITA INFORMACIÓN:

www.ort.edu.mx

*La Licenciatura en Administración y Responsabilidad Social y la Maestría en Orientación Educativa para la Prevención de Adicciones, se encuentran en trámite para obtener el Reconocimiento de Validez Oficial ante la SEP.

What to pay attention to when teaching

A Drop in Performance Can be a Sign of More Advanced Thinking

Sidney Strauss
School of Psychology
Center for Academic Studies
Or Yehuda

Branco Weiss Professor of Research in Child Development and Education (Emeritus)

School of Education
Tel Aviv University

We all know that children get better at solving problems as they get older. Learning is always upwards and onwards. Children get better in their understanding over time. For example, children age 6 can solve all the problems they were able to solve at age four, and then some. This commonplace understanding of learning on the part of educators, parents, etc. is confirmed in our everyday observations.

But there is a surprise here. A line of research I began in the 1980’s, and which continues to this very day, shows that what we take for granted is not always the case. Studies of cognitive development indicate that, for some tasks, children have what is called U-shaped behavioral growth. What this means is that younger children solve a task correctly, older children solve the same task incorrectly and still older children solve it correctly.

Here’s an example. Let’s say we have three cups, two of which have the same amount of water at the same temperature and one of which is empty. We tell the children that the water in the two cups is cold and that they are equally cold. We then pour the water from those two cups into the third, empty cup and proceed to ask the children what the temperature in now. Children age around 4 say, correctly, that it’s the same temperature because all we did was mix same temperature water. Older children around age 6, say that the mixed water is twice as cold as the original water because there is now twice the amount of water. And children around age 8 return to the correct answer that it is the same temperature as the original water because even though there is the more water, that doesn’t mean the water is colder. It’s just more cold water at the same temperature.

Lest the reader think this is an isolated phenomenon that is found only for temperature this surprising finding has been found for tasks that tap children’s understandings of other physics concepts, such as viscosity, sweetness of water, density and pressure. And U-shaped behavioral growth has been found in other domains, as well, such as language learning, the use of metaphors and more.

So how does this happen? How is it that our commonplace understanding of always getting better has sometimes been shown not to be the case? How is it that children are getting worse in problem solving over time?

One answer to these questions is that children actually do improve their underlying thinking over time, but sometimes an advance in what gives rise to answers leads to a drop in their performance in problem-solving. For example, to return to our case of temperature, the youngest children do not pay attention to the amount of water; the older children do pay attention to the amount of water but erroneously think that more of one thing (amount of water) increases another thing (temperature); and the oldest children also pay attention to the amount of water but they don’t think that it affects the temperature.

Notice that not paying attention to the amount of water (that leads to a correct answer) is less advanced than attending to the amount of water (that leads to an incorrect answer). What that means is that in tasks such as this, as our thinking advances, there is a drop in performance.

Normally, were we to see a child solving a task correctly and then after a while she solves it incorrectly, we might get worried. But the way I showed how this drop works, we would understand that that drop in performance is a sign of cognitive advance.

What this implies is that, when teaching, we should pay attention to children’s reasoning about a problem more than if their answer to that problem is correct or not.

Reference:

Strauss, S. (with R. Stavy). (Eds.). (1982). U-shaped behavioral growth. New York: Academic Press.

Sydney Straus is a member of the OLPC Learning Board.

Film festival hosted by a 15-year-old to raise awareness for OLPC

At OLPC we love when we receive messages like this one. It definitely encourages us to keep on moving forward.  Thank you Sydney S!

image001

I’m incredibly happy to be supporting such an organization as One Laptop Per Child. Thank you for being so receptive to a student like myself and for making this process as easy and fun as possible.

I have attached two photos from the event if you need them and here is some information about the film festival:

“Short Films, Long Lasting Effects” is a student film festival dedicated to promoting the art of filmmaking, while raising money and awareness for the charity One Laptop Per Child. This year’s inaugural event, created by 15-year-old sophomore Sydney S, was held on April 15, 2016 at Westhampton Beach High School on Long Island, New York and featured nine student films. Sydney developed a passion for filmmaking in the fourth grade, which led her to premiere her first movie at the local theater, to attend New York Film Academy programs twice, and to lecture about technology both online for a global audience at the Student Technology Conference and at the Suffolk ASSET Conference, the largest technology conference for teachers and administrators on Long Island. This film and technology background encouraged Sydney to fulfill her goal of hosting a charitable film festival.image002
“Short Films, Long Lasting Effects” brought together people from all areas of the community to highlight the talents of Long Island filmmakers. The short films were judged by industry professionals from the community, and a fan favorite prize was awarded to the movie that could raise the most money for One Laptop Per Child in its designated jar. About 100 people filled the seats of the auditorium during the film festival and volunteers in their bright blue shirts were lined up behind donation tables prepared to answer any incoming questions. “Short Films, Long Lasting Effects” was greatly enjoyed by all who attended and with the combined efforts of the film festival and fundraising in the community, succeeded in its goal of raising money to help One Laptop Per Child send laptops to the children in need around the world.

Best,
Sydney S.

Ibirapitá, proyecto de inclusión digital de jubilados en Uruguay. @Plan_Ceibal

El cerebro no se jubila.

Antonio M. Battro

Academia Nacional de Educación, www.acaedu.edu.ar

Pontificia Academia de Ciencias, www.pas.va

Esta nota se propone exponer el mensaje contundente de la gran bióloga italiana a la luz de Ibirapitá, el nuevo programa de inclusión digital del gobierno del Uruguay que ha comenzado a distribuir tabletas conectadas a Internet a las personas jubiladas con ingresos reducidos. Es decir, los mayores de 65 años contarán con los mismos recursos digitales que ya sus nietos han recibido a partir de los 5 años, gracias al “modelo uno a uno”, una laptop/tablet por niño del Plan Ceibal (www.ceibal.edu.uy). De esta manera se está construyendo en el Uruguay un amplio y generoso puente digital que abraza 60 años de vida. Este programa de inclusión digital inter-generacional, el primero de su tipo en el mundo, merece destacarse y ser imitado.

Pueden leer el documento aquí.

Sustainable education: Uruguay’s @Plan_Ceibal

ANTONIO M. BATTRO AND CECILIA DE LA PAZ

Sustainable Humanity, Sustainable Nature: Our Responsibility Pontifical Academy of Sciences, Extra Series 41, Vatican City 2014 Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences, Acta 20, Vatican City 2014 www.pas.va/content/dam/accademia/pdf/es41/es41-battro.pd

This meeting on “sustainable humanity and sustainable nature” is a valuable opportunity to introduce and discuss the notion of “sustainable education”.We are willing to understand and improve the interactions between “human capital and natural capital”.Education is part of the human capital of our societies but the notion of “sustainable education” is still under construction and needs special consideration. In particular it is impossible to imagine a sustainable school system that remains independent of the rapidly expanding digital environment of today.Our society has created a new“virtual ecosystem” which is covering the planet and is modifying the life of millions.The good news is that education can play,and is playing in many cases,an increasing and constructive role in this global process towards equity and solidarity in the human family.We are convinced that a sustainable education must be based on evidences and not on ideologies.A sustainable education must be supported by political, economical, social, technological and pedagogical sustainable programs.

Continue reading here or below:

Animated Video and Call to Action – @OLPCCanada

The OLPC Canada team is excited to share a new animated video highlighting some of the inspiring outcomes when Aboriginal students are connected with educational technology. Please help us build awareness of this initiative by sharing this video on Facebook and Twitter and liking it on Youtube.

OLPC Canada provides 21st century educational tools to Aboriginal students nationwide. To date, they have connected more than 60 Aboriginal education programs and 9,000 students to technology designed with children in mind. Please help raise awareness about this initiative by sharing this video. It takes a network to connect a child.

Learn more at: www.olpccanada.com

OLPC Congratulates Founder of Paraguay Educa

Congratulations to Cecilia Rodriguez Alcala, who was selected as the MBA Student of the Year Award by the Association of MBAs at Tufts University in the United States!

Cecilia is the founder of Paraguay Educa, an NGO which created the first digital city in Paraguay through the implementation of the One Laptop per Child program in the city of Caacupé.  Her important work has resulted in the provision of laptops, training and connectivity to 10,000 children in Paraguay. On behalf of OLPC, we send our gratitude and congratulations!

To read more about Cecilia and this award click here.

Here a video where Cecilia provides more details about here experience with Paraguay Educa:

 

Aprendizaje: una aspiración

Dra. Eleonora Badilla-Saxe

www.elenorabadillasaxe.net

eleonora.badillasaxe@gmail.com

Enseñar: una ilusión

Quienes nos dedicamos a la educación a veces tenemos la ilusión de que nuestros estudiantes aprenden los contenidos que están incluidos en los planes de estudio y que yo les enseño.

Pero en esta ilusión se esconden tres falacias:

• La primera es que, si los estudiantes no aprenden los contenidos prescritos en los planes de estudio, no aprendieron nada.

• La segunda es que, si aprenden los contenidos prescritos en los planes de estudio, aprendieron solamente eso.

• La tercera, que si yo lo enseño, otras personas lo aprenden.

¡Qué desilusión! Si despejo estas tres falacias, resulta que puede ser que lo que yo enseñe, nadie lo aprende, y que aunque nadie aprenda lo que dice el plan de estudios, siempre habrá un aprendizaje. Es decir que aprendan o no lo que está prescrito en el plan de estudios, hay otros aprendizajes riquísimos que yo no percibo por estar tan concentrada en enseñar y evaluar lo que prescribe el plan de estudios.

Aprender: un fenómeno emergente

A partir de la propuesta del Pensamiento Complejo de Edgar Morin, la emergencia o lo emergente ha cobrado relevancia para diversos autores y en distintas áreas. Lo emergente es una respuesta o reacción inesperada, no anticipada, que se da como resultado de la interacción de las partes de un todo.

Aceptamos que el aprendizaje es un fenómeno emergente que surge de la interacción entre diversos procesos neuronales, corporales, afectivos y del entorno, y no puede reducirse a ninguno de los componentes que participan en los procesos. En ese contexto, debemos entender y aceptar que la mayoría de los aprendizajes son inesperados, muchos de ellos imposibles de predecir y que los contenidos de esos aprendizajes son simples y complejos, pero que los complejos no son meros agregados a los primeros.

La aspiración

Resulta entonces que mi aspiración como docente, más que enseñar y evaluar los contenidos prescritos en los planes de estudio, debería estar en identificar y valorar los aprendizajes inesperados e impredecibles que surgen de la interacción de las mentes, las personas, los medios y el entorno.

Un ejemplo *1

Entre los años 2005 y 2008 realicé con mis estudiantes de Educación de la Universidad de Costa Rica, una experiencia con niños y niñas preescolares quienes diseñaron un micromundo en su aula, y dentro de este, una criatura que podía ser programada con un comportamiento particular. *2

Mis estudiantes, muy pendientes del plan de estudios oficial para el nivel de preescolar, pudieron constatar que las actividades propuestas les permitieron a los niños y niñas manifestar conocimiento sobre los contenidos previstos en dicho plan: relaciones espaciales, colores, formas geométricas…

Yo me asombraba con el aprendizaje emergente que construían aquellos pequeños y que, por inesperado e impredecible, pasaba desapercibido para las docentes investigadoras.

Al llamar la atención de las investigadoras y solicitar ayuda de otras personas observadoras, pudimos constatar que, además de los contenidos prescritos en el plan de estudios de preescolar, los niños y niñas estaban estableciendo el conocimiento básico que les permitirá construir conocimiento sobre:

  • Fuerza y movimiento
  • Desplazamiento
  • Potencia
  • Fricción
  • Diferencia entre fuerza y velocidad
  • Energía potencial y energía cinética

¡Antes de los 6 años! Contenidos no incluidos en el Plan de Estudios de Preescolar. Aprendizaje inesperado, impredecible. Sin que nadie lo enseñara.

La labor docente cada vez se vuelve más interesante y desafiante.

 

*1 Ver experiencia completa en http://revista.inie.ucr.ac.cr/index.php/aie/article/view/241/240

*2 Etapa básica de “robótica”

Students can be part of Google Code-in with SugarLabs

A global, online open source development & outreach contest for pre­-college students ages 13-­17

The Google Code-­in contest gives students around the world an opportunity to explore the world of open source development. Google not only runs open source software throughout our business, we value the way the open source model encourages people to work together on shared goals over the internet.

Give it a try from December 7th, 2015 to January 25th, 2016!

Participants complete “tasks” of their choice for a variety of open source software projects. Students can earn t-­shirts, certificates, and hooded sweatshirts for their work. Each software project will name two students as their grand prize winners and those students win a four day trip to in Mountain View, CA, USA in June 2016.

Since open source development is much more than just computer programming, there are lots of different kinds of tasks to choose from, broken out into five major categories:

1. Code: Writing or refactoring code

2. Documentation/Training: Creating and editing documentation and helping others learn

3. Outreach/Research: Community management and outreach/marketing, or studying problems and recommending solutions

4. Quality Assurance: Testing to ensure code is of high quality

5. User interface: User experience research or user interface design

This year students can work with 14 open source organizations: Apertium, Copyleft Games Group, Drupal, FOSSASIA, Haiku, KDE, MetaBrainz, OpenMRS, RTEMS, SCoRe, Sugar Labs, Systers, Ubuntu, and Wikimedia Foundation.

Over the past five years, over 2200 students from 87 countries completed at least one task in the contest. This year we hope to have even more students participate globally. Please help us spread the word and bring more students into the open source family!

Visit g.co/codein to learn more about the contest. For even more information and contest updates, read our Frequently Asked Questions, follow our blog or join our mailing list.

The Google Code-­in contest starts on December 7, 2015!

 

Becas para Maestría por Universidad ORT México a amigos de OLPC

Con fundamento en el convenio de colaboración entre nuestras instituciones, la Universidad ORT México ofrecerá becas del 50% en inscripción y colegiatura para candidatos referidos de OLPC que sean admitidos en el programa de Maestría en Innovación Educativa.  
 
Puede consultar los detalles del programa en el siguiente enlace: http://www.ort.edu.mx/p/med.html
 
Para poder solicitar admisión y beca institucional, deberá ingresar en el siguiente enlace y seguir las instrucciones:
 
Para cualquier duda, comunicarse a la  Coordinación de Admisiones al teléfono

 

Social Responsibility in Central America – CNN

OLPC is grateful to the Grupo Lafise for its continued support for the One Laptop Per Child program. Thanks to its generous donations, OLPC continues to change the world, one child at a time.

http://cnnespanol.cnn.com/2015/09/11/la-fuerza-de-la-conciencia-social-en-las-empresas-productivas/

http://cnnespanol.cnn.com/2015/09/01/fuerza-en-movimiento-en-centroamerica-empresas-con-conciencia-social/

Hangout (Spanish): https://plus.google.com/events/cqf0jl9k1mlr5qukk6dddu92ft4

OLPC Announces Partnership with Zamora Teran Foundation

One Laptop per Child (OLPC) announced today a partnership with the Zamora Teran Foundation, a non-profit organization, dedicated to the successful implementation of OLPC programs throughout Central America. OLPC, in partnership with the Zamora Teran Foundation, will provide innovative teacher training, professional development opportunities, and related implementation services, to OLPC programs around the world.

The Zamora Teran Foundation  has distributed more than 42,000 OLPC Laptops to children in Nicaragua and is currently providing implementation support services to more than 50,000 OLPC Laptops in Honduras and 5,000 OLPC Laptops in Costa Rica. The results are impressive, with improvements in school retention rates and academic achievement.

“We are extremely pleased to have the opportunity to share our expertise in OLPC program implementation with schools and communities around the world,” said Maria Josefina Teran Zamora, President of the Zamora Teran Foundation. “We believe that in joining forces, we are creating a better future for all.”

The services offered by OLPC in partnership with the Zamora Teran Foundation focus on six components that are essential for a successful OLPC Laptop program.  The organizations offer a comprehensive teacher training program, as well as a full logistics and implementation solution. Services include the provision of advanced technical support and training to local, on-the-ground teams to ensure program sustainability. Monitoring and evaluation services are available to ensure that the goals of each program are defined and achieved. The organizations work with each local community to develop a strong community of volunteers  to support the program, and a strong network of development, to ensure the expansion of each program. With these six essential components, OLPC offers a comprehensive ecosystem of support to each program.

For more information about the One Laptop Per Child the Zamora Teran Foundation, please contact Leah (leah@laptop.org) .

OLPC was founded in 2005 with the goal of transforming education through the provision of a durable, connected, laptop computer to every child in the world. To date, OLPC has distributed more than 3 million laptops to children around the world.