OLPC and the Foundation Zamora Teran, participated in a photo exhibit hosted by the United Nations as part of the 55th Commission on Social Development.

OLPC and the Foundation Zamora Teran, participated in a photo exhibit hosted by the United Nations as part of the 55th Commission on Social Development. The exhibition was held at the UN headquarters in NYC during February of 2017. The exhibit focused on efforts around the world to implement strategies for eradicating poverty to achieve sustainable development for all. OLPC and FZT were featured due to their work to eradicate poverty through education. Please click here to see the photos:

http://unsdn.org/2017/01/30/csocd55-photo-exhibition-showcases-poverty-eradication/

Photo-ExhibitionSalomón de la Selva (2) Gemelas

Fundación Gente Unida: A People United

In 1992, Father Jorge Villalobos Ortega, a Mexican priest, arrived in the city of Medellin, Antioquia, and beyond the beauty of his mountains he could see the belts of misery that surrounded the Valley of Aburrá.

He asked a group of young people to whom he lectured on human value: Why are we indifferent to the situation of poverty and violence in Medellin?

In response, the group began to visit the surrounding community in order to experience its reality. The group visited with the families of the Moravia neighborhood, the Morro sector, the old dump of Medellín, in order to better understand the community’s needs. Local residents had an opportunity to share their dreams and ideals with the group.

In 1993, the group opened an educational room and 33 children came to receive an education. It became clear to Father Villalobos and his group that the community needed education and training in order to become the creators of a better future.

A People United and Youth for Peace Foundation

These experiences led to the creation of a People United and Youth For Peace Foundation, a non-governmental organization dedicated to providing education, training and protection to vulnerable children and young people, in order to meet their educational and training needs. The Foundation provides resources, continuous training and social responsibility exercises in order to improve the quality of life in the community.

The Foundation provides  protection and education to the most vulnerable population of Medellín and its metropolitan area. Currently, there are five  Educational Centers located in the most vulnerable areas of the city, including the Moravia, Santo Domingo (La Esperanza), Manrique (La Honda), Belén (Villa Café) and Robledo (Pajarito) neighborhoods. The Foundation feeds more than 3,200 children, young people and adults. It provides educational opportunities from Early Childhood, Pre-school, Basic Primary, Basic Secondary to Adult Education. It houses  170 children and young people in the Bohio de María Home who have suffered domestic violence, abuse or neglect. These children and young adults receive counseling, education and training and range from 3 months of age to university graduates.

At present, 1399 XO Laptops are being used in the educational centers. The educational component is supported by the Marina Orth Foundation.

http://www.genteunida.org.co/fundacion-gente-unida-5Fundacion Gente Unida Bloggente-unida-12

Fundacion Gente Unida and Youth for Peace #Colombia

Fundación Gente Unida (The Foundation for United People- the “Foundation”) is a non-governmental organization created to provide education, training, and protection of children and young people in vulnerable situations. The organization works to meet their basic and educational needs with available resources, in an effort to improve their quality of life.

fundacion-gente-unida-1In 1992, Father Jorge Villalobos Ortega, a priest from Mexico, arrived in Medellin, Antioquia, Colombia.

He saw beyond the beauty of the mountains to the shantytowns surrounding the Valley of Aburra. He spent time with a group of young people and participated in conferences on human values, and he asked them: “Why are you indifferent to the poverty and violence in Medellin?” The group began a profound and painful experience as they visited families living in the impoverished Moravia neighborhood. The group discussed the needs of these families and they shared their hopes and dreams with the young group.

fundacion-gente-unida-9 In 1993, Father Villalobos Ortega started an educational program involving 33 children from this community. The goal was not only to meet the children’s immediate needs but also to teach them so they could become the builders of their own futures.

fundacion-gente-unida-2 The social work of the Foundation is the concrete expression of its commitment to solidarity that every human should have for one another. The Foundation is actively working to build a more just society based on love, as the Hindu proverb states: “It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness.”gente-unida-12

The Foundation provides protection and education to the most vulnerable people living in the Medellin metropolitan area. There are currently five educational centers located in the most disadvantaged areas of the city: Moravia, Santo Domingo (La Esperanza), Manrique (La Honda), Belen (Villa Café) and Robledo (Pajarito). The educational centers feed and educate 3,200 children, youth, and adults.

Educational programs include early childhood, preschool, primary, secondary and adult education courses. More than 170 children and youth live in the Mary Bohio Home, a shelter for children who have suffered from domestic violence, abuse, and/or neglect. The Foundation provides a home, care, and education for these children who range from 3 months of age through college age students.

In 2009, the Foundation launched the PERLAS project, a program focused on using a laptop for learning. More than 2,000 OLPC Laptops were incorporated into the classroom in an effort to make learning more fun and enriching for participating children. Children were given an opportunity to use a technological tool that would soon become their best companion in their academic training.

Children had the opportunity to participate in the world of technology, the world that was reserved only for those with sufficient financial resources, despite the pervasiveness of technology in our daily lives.

In 2010, additional 374 OLPC Laptops were acquired in order to include 1st through 5th graders in the educational program. Each OLPC Laptop given became an immediate ally of the child. Children now had a friendly team of support as they entered the world of technology, a world that seemed distant and unattainable  before.

Thanks to the OLPC Laptop, homework became a more pleasant task and students had the opportunity to chat, share activities and play without having to be physically close to one another. This was certainly a surprise for the students!

The Foundation created a unique security system for the OLPC Laptop. When a machine is lost, the computer turns off and is unusable. The technical teams also created activation keys for the machines according to the school calendar. All coding was generated on the Foundation’s servers.

At present, there are 1399 OLPC Laptops in use in the Foundation’s educational centers, as follows:

 Moravia Headquarters: 230 OLPC Laptops version 4.0

 Sagrada Familia: 206 OLPC Laptops version 4.0

 La Esperanza: 384 OLPC Laptops versions 1.75 and 4.0

 Luz de Oriente: 579 OLPC Laptops version 4.0

The OLPC educational program and use of the OLPC Laptops are being supported by the Marina Orth Foundation during 2016. The Foundation is grateful for this collaboration!

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Mokshith Voodarla, a high school student with a cause @OLPC

mokshith-1Mokshith Voodarla is a high school student who made a generous donation to OLPC.

Read his thoughts about the impact of technology in his own life and in the world:

 

From a young age, I’ve been amazed by the way technology helps us in our daily lives. It was mind-boggling to me when I saw subtle things like turning on a TV with a remote happen. This led me to the realization that I wanted to build technology that made people’s lives easier. I’ve always liked to see something happen after writing a program. This started off with LEGO Mindstorms but has come all the way to building Android Apps that automatically take notes for you when taking a picture of a textbook. 
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I wanted to benefit as many people as I could with the knowledge I had so I decided to teach kids how to build Android apps. While doing this, I wanted to maximize the benefit of this work, and that’s when I remembered One Laptop Per Child. I’ve always taken for granted the resources I had to do things and I wanted as many people as possible to receive the resources and opportunities to do the same. I realized that by donating to OLPC, my work would help benefit a lot of people. I chose to do just that. 


Working with the kids was great. We started off from them not knowing anything at all to them being able to build a whole calculator all by themselves. We did this over the course of nine weeks. I was happy that I was able to spread that feeling of amazement on many people’s faces when they saw that what they programmed. That kind of feeling is what I live for and I really felt it when I saw those kids experience just that. The feeling itself is indescribable but it’s just amazing. 
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Teaching these students and then being able to donate to OLPC was a very worthwhile experience for me and I would recommend if anyone else can, they should make a donation as well. OLPC does great things in developing countries and is a real reason why the world is accelerating faster and faster all the time. All reasons support helping the OLPC cause.

How Ometepe Became Latin America’s First Digital Island

Originaly posted BY ON

By Leah Shadle on behalf of One Laptop Per Child

In the heart of Nicaragua lies the largest lake in Central America, Lake Nicaragua. Millions of years ago, a volcanic eruption formed a curious island in this freshwater lake composed of two volcanoes — Concepcion and Maderas — the former of which is still active. Concepcion has an altitude of 1,610 meters, which makes Ometepe the world’s highest island on a lake. Volcanic ash has created an extremely fertile island and the volcanoes are visible everywhere on the island. Ometepe is truly a paradise, with its tropical, lush and magical air and soil.

In addition to the natural brilliance of the island and its volcanoes, Ometepe recently became the first digital island in the Americas. To put that in numbers, 100% of its 5,000 elementary school children and all teachers received a laptop connected to high-speed Internet, as part of the One Laptop Per Child educational initiative. Participating students and teachers receive OLPC laptops and the training and support needed to truly realize the potential of these machines

Continue reading HERE.

Learning from Seymour Papert – #BacktoLearning

Far beyond the idea of giving computers to children with “an educational purpose”, like if education meant just providing content to be consumed, the origins of the learning philosophy of OLPC has been to provide kids with computers so that they can compute.

 

Seymour Papert believed, supported by decades of research, that by computing (coding, programming), the learner could be empowered to understand, create and think about their own learning, especially at early childhoold.

This panel from the Spring 2014 Member Event at the MIT Media Lab will explore more in detail the learning vision of Papert. Enjoy!

Panelists: Mitch Resnick, Marvin Minsky, Alan Kay, and Nicholas Negroponte.